True Country by Kim Scott Online

True Country
Title : True Country
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781863680387
Language : English
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 304

A young school teacher is posted to a remote Aboriginal community, and through his experiences, his encounter with the local people, his discovery of the history of the community, his own history and his Aboriginality are revealed." "Like many others in the novel, Billy is struggling to find a meaningful cultural identity and to create a better future from the wreckage ofA young school teacher is posted to a remote Aboriginal community, and through his experiences, his encounter with the local people, his discovery of the history of the community, his own history and his Aboriginality are revealed." "Like many others in the novel, Billy is struggling to find a meaningful cultural identity and to create a better future from the wreckage of the recent history of Aboriginal people. What he finds at Karnama is a disintegrating community, characterised by government handouts, alcoholism, wife-beating, petrol-sniffing and an indifference to traditional beliefs and practices. It is a depressingly familiar litany of social problems which confirms the smug racial stereotypes of the white community to which Billy initially belongs." "True Country offers no clear-cut solution to the realities of powerlessness. What it leaves us with is Billy's vision of the 'true country' which he shares with the unnamed Aboriginal narrator in the final pages of the novel.


True Country Reviews

  • Kimbofo

    True Country, Kim Scott’s debut novel, was first published in 1999. It tells the story of Billy, a young teacher, who moves to a remote settlement in Australia’s far north to take up a job at a local school.Here, in a Christian mission now in a decline and a government administrative outpost struggling to keep staff, Billy and his wife, Liz, find themselves thrust into an Aboriginal community that appears to be in disarray. Yet Billy is drawn to the people and the astonishing landscape in wh [...]

  • Maria Gunn

    Gorgeous language. I love Scott's use of both Noongar and English. The story would be poorer without either. The book is set in North-Western Australia and tells the story of a school teacher and his wife arriving to teach at an Aboriginal settlement school. Scott sketches settings unobtrusively, with no no obvious emphasis, yet the book's sense of place is vivid and engrossing. Clever, moving book.

  • Heather Browning

    I found it really difficult to get through this book. Partially because the multiple narratives became confusing at times, but largely because overall I didn't find the story compelling enough to make it worthwhile.

  • Lisa

    True Country, Kim Scott’s debut novel first published in 1993, has been on my TBR for ages, so I was happy to join a readalong with Emma at Book Around the Corner. But unlike Kim at Reading Matters, I did not love this book. It is powerful writing, and innovative in design and intent, but it is also deeply depressing because it paints such a vivid picture of the dysfunctional behaviours that we are told still plague indigenous communities today.True Country is a kind of bildungsroman, but one [...]

  • Monika

    3.5

  • S'hi

    Through many voices – past and present, embodied and ethereal – Kim Scott explores the terrain we are all still wanting to claim as out own, yet cannot hold by mere words. From the first stumbling conversation and the patience of the speaker in awaiting the proof of listening, the familiarity of images and expectations in indigenous communities opens out to possibilities we must each become a part to. Ultimately this book is an invitation to participate. And it recognises this is not a comfo [...]

  • Nell

    A beautiful book set in what I read as a fictionalized version of Kalumburu. Scott renders the full-on beauty of the north Kimberley and the complications of life on the community perfectly. The impressionist-y quality of the storytelling and the shifting voices and perspectives reflect his ambivalence about his role in the community, his relationship with stories and country, and his own Aboriginality.

  • Rebecca

    This is a beautifully written book in which the narrative (other than the traditional Aboriginal Welcome) begins with Billy, slowly incorporating more voices of those around him until there is a strange unity in the multitude. It is about finding one's home, while the land simultaneously rejects those who do not belong. Perhaps all that I can say against the book is that it does have some pacing issues, rushing a bit at certain points, particularly in the last few chapters.

  • Claire Melanie

    This is my favourite of Scott's works that I've read thus far. It's an intense, illuminating, challenging and beautifully written work that forces you to reflect on so many aspects of Aboriginal/Settler relations in Australia.

  • Elaine Langley

    Because of all the hype about this book I was really looking forward to reading it but instead I found it so difficult to read that I gave up after about fifty pages. I found it very confusing and frankly not interesting enough to be worthwhile trudging on with it.

  • Ellen Shi

    This book was v complex. I think I would need to read it again to fully understand it. Too bad it's too boring that I will probably never pick it up again lol

  • Gretel

    I really liked the way this book was written. Even from the opening page it had my attention, even though nothing was really happening.