Kid Gloves: A Voyage Round My Father by Adam Mars-Jones Online

Kid Gloves: A Voyage Round My Father
Title : Kid Gloves: A Voyage Round My Father
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781846148750
Language : English
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 224

When his widowed father - once a high court judge and always a formidable figure - drifted into vagueness if not dementia, the writer Adam Mars-Jones took responsibility for his care. Intimately trapped in the London flat where the family had always lived, the two men entered an oblique new stage in their relationship. In the aftermath of an unlooked-for intimacy, Mars-JonWhen his widowed father - once a high court judge and always a formidable figure - drifted into vagueness if not dementia, the writer Adam Mars-Jones took responsibility for his care. Intimately trapped in the London flat where the family had always lived, the two men entered an oblique new stage in their relationship. In the aftermath of an unlooked-for intimacy, Mars-Jones has written a book devoted to particular emotions and events. Kid Gloves is a highly entertaining book about (among other things) families, the legal profession, and the vexed question of Welsh identity. It is necessarily also a book about the writer himself - and the implausible, long-delayed moment, some years before, when he told his sexually conservative father about his own orientation, taking the homophobic bull by the horns. The supporting cast includes Ian Fleming, the Moors Murderers, Jacqueline Bisset and Gilbert O'Sullivan, the singer-songwriter whose trademark look kept long shorts from their rightful place on the fashion pages for so many years.


Kid Gloves: A Voyage Round My Father Reviews

  • Robert Ronsson

    Meh.Yes, he writes well at times and tells chucklesome anecdotes. I read it from from front page to last with some enjoyment. It was like half-listening to a Radio 4 'amusing' documentary about a minor figure in public life.My problem is that there are probably hundreds of better written, riveting accounts of families rotting away in publishers' slush piles. The difference? They were written by ordinary people without the 'golden ticket' of a public school and Oxbridge education. Mr Mars-Jones, [...]

  • Stef Smulders

    These memories have no structure at all, they just meander from one subject to another and do require more background knowledge of British culture than I can come up with.

  • David Gee

    Subtitled ‘A Voyage Round My Father’ (borrowing from John Mortimer’s memorable biography), this is a subtle and charming memoir from one of Britain’s leading gay writers. William Mars-Jones was a Queens Counsel, a Knight and a High Court Judge. As a father he was somewhat Victorian, not touchy-feely like today’s dads (up to and including Prince William), not noted for humour, more generous with criticism than praise. He was also homophobic, making him a less than ideal parent for Adam. [...]

  • Belinda

    In his memoir KID GLOVES: A VOYAGE AROUND MY FATHER, Adam Mars-Jones cuts his poor father very little slack. When his dad expresses condolences, albeit in a clumsy fashion, his son finds fault with the wording. When Mars-Jones senior laments his own failure to be demonstrative and tactile with his children, the son remains unimpressed. And when the father finally comes to an accommodation with his son's sexuality, the latter reacts with irritation and scepticism. I know that I would welcome any [...]

  • Patrick

    This is a book which feels like an uneasy mix of memoir, diary and biography. From the subtitle of ‘A Voyage Round My Father’ (borrowed from John Mortimer) and the back-cover blurb, it’s framed as the first, but there is a surprising amount of the other two as well. The author, Adam Mars-Jones, was the son of William Mars-Jones, who was a very highly regarded lawyer and judge; initially, the book begins with his final years, but it flits back and forth in time between the author’s childh [...]

  • Richard Newton

    A great rambling journey through the life of the author. The central premise is meant to be the relationship between the author and his father, with a challenge being the author's homosexuality and his father being a rampant homophobe. In reality, this forms only one thread in a series of stories and themes which flow through the book. It is at times beautifully written, insightful, (such as his discussion of relationships on page 215) and occasionally very funny (see page 224-225 for an an exam [...]

  • George Barnett

    A book to be read in one sitting if you have the time. It's an extended meditation on the son's relationship with his father where the son is gay and the father is a homophobe. When the father is also a judge and the son a successful writer the book becomes a fascinating and sometimes funny account of negotiated positions, misunderstandings, huge resentments and so on. Ultimately the son cares for the father through his last years with dementia. Adam Mars-Jones writes an exceedingly clever turn [...]

  • Mandy

    Although completely mesmerised by this book, loving the writing, and having many moments of little shocks of recognition at the depiction of minute family politics, I have a strong opinion that the experience of reading this book would be better if there were chapters and some kind of topic separators, and if the anecdotes and understandings and theories related were arranged in the traditional manner for biography: chronologically. I feel that I have been made to hurry through this book, feelin [...]

  • Julie West

    Fascinating insights and erudite commentary of the author's family life and upbringing in Gray's Inn London. Fluent, assured and ultimately poignant account of things an extraordinarily gifted man holds dear. Studded with dry wit. Touching on the legal world, social history, homosexuality, family foibles and parental influence this book, written by a product of Westminster school and my old Cambridge college, Trinity Hall, is a most enjoyable read.

  • Julia

    I love Adam Mars-Jones' sense of humour, but this is a book for readers who are on the same wavelength as the author. Some of the comments and turns of phrase made me laugh out loud, but the book tended to ramble.

  • Nick

    Witty, camp, warm about a difficult father.

  • !Tæmbuŝu

    Reviewed by The Guardian (24 May 2016)

  • Mak Horner

    Bitter sweet memoir of a formidable, difficult man reduced by dementia to almost complete dependence on the son he had despised because of his homosexuality. There is an imperfect reconciliation on both parts before he dies.