Doin' the Charleston: Black Roots of American Popular Music & the Jenkins Orphanage Legacy by Mark R. Jones Online

Doin' the Charleston: Black Roots of American Popular Music & the Jenkins Orphanage Legacy
Title : Doin' the Charleston: Black Roots of American Popular Music & the Jenkins Orphanage Legacy
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : B00EKTD8GK
Language : English
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 347

FROM RAGS TO RAGTIME - THEY CREATED THE SOUNDTRACK OF THE 20TH CENTURY! For the first time, here is the stirring story of the Jenkins Orphanage Band and its role in American popular music. From slavery to freedom, follow the inspirational rags-to-riches story of some of America’s greatest jazz musicians brought together by the determination of one man, a freed black slaveFROM RAGS TO RAGTIME - THEY CREATED THE SOUNDTRACK OF THE 20TH CENTURY! For the first time, here is the stirring story of the Jenkins Orphanage Band and its role in American popular music. From slavery to freedom, follow the inspirational rags-to-riches story of some of America’s greatest jazz musicians brought together by the determination of one man, a freed black slave named Rev. Daniel Jenkins. His Jazz Nursery revolutionized the music world! One cold December day in 1891, Rev. Jenkins discovered four black children huddled together in a railroad car. He had more than 500 children in his care. To support the Orphanage, Jenkins organized a brass band which performed on the Charleston streets for hand-outs. Ten years later, the Jenkins Band appeared in London, played for President Teddy Roosevelt and premiered on Broadway. Members of the Jenkins Band played with Duke Ellington, Count Basie and Louis Armstrong. Then, tragically in 1919, one of the Jenkins’ musicians committed a brutal murder which shocked America! During the next decade, the Roaring 20s, America underwent a tumultuous change in which everybody was soon DOIN’ THE CHARLESTON! ILLUSTRATED WITH MORE THAN 70 PHOTOS!


Doin' the Charleston: Black Roots of American Popular Music & the Jenkins Orphanage Legacy Reviews

  • Rebekkila

    Having lived in the city of Charleston for 14 years, I was aware of some of the wicked events that were detailed in the book. I had heard of the Lavinia Fischer story but the account I had heard was way more creepy. I also liked the pirate stories. I have been inside the Charleston exchange and toured the dungeon where the pirates were held. I knew of Anne Bonney and Mary Read, but I did not realize that they were lovers. I wish that I had read the book when I lived there because it gave the str [...]

  • James Caskey

    Ever read a book and wish you had written it? Here's one of the best books about Charleston that I've ever read. Even with a re-read, it's still surprising how unbelievably and delightfully sinful the history of the 'Holy City' really is. No ghosts (although there is a great chapter about Lavinia Fisher), but enough sex, scandal, and good ol' fashioned deviance to make you never look at the place the same way ever again. Written in an engaging and entertaining style, the author combines a histor [...]

  • Ashlee

    The telling of these stories felt like you were on a tour, makes sense as the author is tour guide. A nice little overview of each case. Not a bad quick read.

  • Fishface

    This one was just OK. The main virtue of the book it that it leads you to a lot of other reading so you can find out much more about the 10 cases discussed in Jones's summaries of the situations.

  • DeAndria Amick

    I love anything and everything Charleston. Deep family roots back to the early 1700’s in South Carolina and tracing genealogy back let me know Charleston is only pretty on the outside. When I did a ghost tour the guide mentioned this book. It has touched on a lot of things I remember as a child of haints and being ridden by the hag. It’s also renewed my fascination with the pirates that roamed right off our beaches.

  • Sarah Vied

    I found the book extremely interesting, especially since I've been living in Charleston for the past few years. I've always been drawn to Charleston because of its rich history, but had no idea about all of the debauchery and the city's drunkenness in its formative years. I felt myself imagining significant or interesting historical events that took place as described in the book and where all of the present day locations are. Charleston has so much history, but it was really cool to hear about [...]

  • Amy

    I picked up this copy of Wicked Charleston in preparation for skyring's visit in Australia. I'm hoping to be able to ask the author to sign it, and also hoping to take skyring on the Wicked Charleston tour. Seems like it would be his cuppa!Any book that begans with the quote: "A man with an erection heeds no advice," has got to be a fun read.Wicked Charleston is the history of drinking, prostitution, murder, wayward ministers, lesbian pirates and crime & punishment of Charleston, SC from 167 [...]

  • Charlene Connors

    Reading this book is like opening a treasure chest; one in which the author, Mark R. Jones, shares his love of Charleston and its history.The city is lovingly described its scents, colors, architecture, the people. The flavor of this southern city is on every page. The story of the Jenkins Orphange Legacy and how instrumental it is in the emergence of Jazz is fascinating. This is a book every jazz lover, southern history buff, or someone looking for a really interestng and fun book should read. [...]

  • Lucienne wells

    This book was written by a tour guide for the city of Charleston, SC, and it definately has that type of feel to it, but I really liked it. With such great chapters as "Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper- the Greatest Whoremaster," and pirate stories, what's not to like! I'm not really sure how to recomend this one, if you've been to Charleston- read it. If you haven't read it if you like short, odd, historiaclly accurate tales then you should read it too.

  • Pam Koenig

    The more things change, the more they remain the same. A collection of true crime stories that have occurred in South Carolina during a 100 year time period. Corruption and the good old boy system show how the meaning of justice depends on who the criminal was.

  • Meaghan

    Meh. This was okay, and certainly enlightened me to just how violent South Carolina was during the early 1900s, but it didn't go into very much detail. Each case write-up was only a few pages long. I wish it had been more in-depth.

  • Mark

  • Mark