Under the Devil's Eye: The British Military Experience in Macedonia 1915-18 by Alan Wakefield Simon Moody Online

Under the Devil's Eye: The British Military Experience in Macedonia 1915-18
Title : Under the Devil's Eye: The British Military Experience in Macedonia 1915-18
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781848844612
Language : English
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 272

The authors have researched the Salonika Campaign in every detail, from the arrival of the first British troops in 1915 to final victory. During this period large numbers of British and allied troops were tied up in the strategically vital Balkans. Salonika was converted into a vast military base and over 70 miles of defensive works were created.We learn of the disappointmThe authors have researched the Salonika Campaign in every detail, from the arrival of the first British troops in 1915 to final victory. During this period large numbers of British and allied troops were tied up in the strategically vital Balkans. Salonika was converted into a vast military base and over 70 miles of defensive works were created.We learn of the disappointments of the British XII Corps offensive in April/May 1917 (The First Battle of Doiran) and the more successful aggressive raiding in the Struma Valley. Using first hand accounts, a vivid picture of life for the British Army is painted, with the roles of the Royal Flying Corps/RAF and RNAS well covered.The campaign drew to a victorious conclusion with the defeat of the Bulgarians in 1918 but the British Salonika Army remained in place until 1921. The effect of this slow demobilization is also covered.


Under the Devil's Eye: The British Military Experience in Macedonia 1915-18 Reviews

  • Rick

    I read this book as the Squadron in which I currently serve was one of the Field Ambulances that took part in this campaign. In addition, although I am a keen amateur military historian, I know almost nothing about this particular aspect of the First World War.The book is well written and easy to read. Although it is very date-factual, as almost all history books are, there is liberal use of first-hand accounts of the various aspects of the campaign, especially the two main Doiran battles.The au [...]

  • Philip Edwards

    I don't remember my grandfather. He died when I was about 3. I've searched my memory, but there is nothing there. However, my mother told me that he'd served in Salonika during WW1. He also left behind a brass matchbox case that he'd made. It was engraved with dates and his service record from his war. I decided to try to find out moe. I was so glad that I came across this book. It certainly helped me to fill in some gaps in my family history. I loved the sections that gave personal stories from [...]

  • Nicholas Whyte

    nhwvejournal/689793ml[return][return]This is much more of a grass-roots story compared to Alan Palmer's geopolitical survey, livened up by direct accounts from the soldiers themselves, either from contemporary letters or from memoirs. It also concentrates exclusively on the British, with one benefit being an entire chapter on the Struma Valley battles of 1916 which Palmer almost ignores. The maps are by far the clearest of any of the books I've consulted so far (though I do wish I had access to [...]

  • Joss

    My grandfather and his brothers served in Salonika so this was very interesting to me. Along with details of battles, maps and photographs there are a lot of diary entries from the men who were there. Troops suffered from malaria and dysentery, lack of food and supplies, nowhere to go in their "rest periods" intense heat in the summer and cold in the winter. And of course they won their final battle before those in France. Yet it has all been neglected and this is a very timely reminder of what [...]

  • Bill V

    This is a nice book on a niche aspect of the war. The author writes well and clearly. The book provides an ample number of maps which, given how obscure this part of the war was, are very useful to have. There are a few awkward sentences and I feel there was a bit of an overreliance on quotes. The number and size of the quotes seem to have been used in order to extend the length of the book.